Age, Race, Ethnicity, and Lifestyle Altering in Acute Coronary Syndromes

Age, Race, Ethnicity, and Lifestyle Altering in Acute Coronary Syndromes

It is well known that race affects health risks but researchers have not established whether there are links between race and longevity or disease risks and longevity. There are several theories regarding the link between race and longevity and several studies suggest that genetic differences between races may affect disease risk or help explain why some people live longer than others. Some research suggests that genetic differences between races lead to differences in longevity and there is evidence that genetic differences between human races are causing some diseases that were associated with other diseases prior to the advent of genetic science. The study conducted was designed to better understanding these genetic associations by examining survival rates among dialysis patients by race, ethnicity, and age.

 

Researchers examined data from a national dialysis database to find out which patients were most likely to survive until they reached the age of 100. The median survival time for African American and Caucasian patients was about three years; however, the difference in median time to death did not reach statistical significance. Overall survival rates were similar for all racial groups but the difference in median time to death was greater for African Americans than for Caucasians. Other outcome measures included the percentage of patients who reached the end of the study before death, the percentage who died from any cause, the percentage who lived for at least 5 years after random treatment, the percentage of patients who completed at least one year of follow up, the percentage who had at least one new disease, the percentage of patients who were hospitalized, and the percentage of patients who received at least one organ transplant.

 

Researchers performed both a demographic analysis and a clinical analysis of the data. Their demographic analysis focused on overall health and demographics including details about the patient’s past health status including smoking, weight, diabetes, history of heart or kidney disease, cancer, prevalent illnesses such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, and current health status including diabetes, hypertension, and prevalent infections. They also investigated the role of sex, age, race, ethnicity (Hispanic or non-Hispanic), education, income, country of origin, family history of health, and geographic location. They performed a clinical analysis of the data to evaluate the impact of H. pylori on the patient’s survival, quality of life, and medical outcomes. Although previous studies have suggested an association between H. pylori and stomach ulcer, this is the first report describing the long-term effects of this common ulcer on patients with chronic heart disease on whom medical treatment is not available.

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